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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of goes to at what's at the heart of constitutionalism and rule of law, and looking back at the list of things that you listed. in the course of that conversation after a long discussion about the constitutionalism, a center. essentially blackmun turns to moyers and says it's really the preamble that breathes life into the constitution. and i wondered whether that's a point of view that you hold and whether you think it has relevance in the situation we're talking about now. >> , preamble, we the people and united states, et cetera, i used to be able to quote it, i don't think i can now. anyway, it's written down. and the preamble is important saying we the people. but is not the only thing. and i say that because i do think, i had a very interesting conversation in china, i thought. i've gone there twice. the first time was a few years ago, maybe eight or 10, when we went to beijing and then we went to shanghai. and in shanghai we are asked to meet with a group of businessm businessmen, and these businessmen have all been involved in the.com. they lost a lot of money. most of them h
.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to liv
valley. >> glor: and that is not all. apart from the fiscal cliff febate, some other laws are due to expire january 1, and that could cost americans plenty. ar starters, the payroll tax break will end. illial security taxes will go from 4.2% back to 6.2%. if the farm bill is allowed to expire, it is feared milk prices could rise sharply. hundreds of american families famiheartbroken tonight after russian president vladimir putin banned all adoption of russian children by americans. it is believed to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decades, more , mo 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little g
the conflicting answers. plus, 2013 will be a pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference.
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
, at least 10 states have passed laws that require people to show a government- issued photo id when they go to the polls. while supporters say the laws protect against voter fraud, others argue they're more likely to suppress voter turnout among people of color, the poor and proper id and find it harder to obtain one. in total, 16 states have passed restrictive voting laws that could shape the 2012 election, including the vital swing states of florida and pennsylvania. well, on monday, naacp president and ceo ben jealous made voting rights the center of his address to the group's annual convention in houston. >> we have a choice to make. we can allow this election to be stolen in advance, as politicians from pennsylvania and recently bragged about money thought no one was listening. talking about his state's voter id law. we can double down on democracy. and overcome the rising tide of voter suppression with a higher daughter of voter registration and mobilization and activation and protection. amy goodman: well, today we're joined by a leader of the civil rights movement who risked his lif
said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion
father-in-law died inherited three slaves. the first lady's great great grandmother and she ended up in a rough rural community in georgia, the vast majority of people were not slave voters, white men worked the fields along the slaves they own if they owned annie and it was quite a different experience than the one we often think about. >> it was quite a different experience and i really enjoyed reading about the people of that day, how she worked the fields and the men who owned her worked the fields. i know that you were not able to determine the relationship between millvinia and the men who owned her. and i also know, code of silence. she never talked about it and her descendants never talked about it. i noticed the same thing in her own family and other families as well. it is about wilkerson who wrote about the great migration, the same code of silence in her family. what is up with that code of silence? >> this is a painful chapter of american history for many families. so i think at the time, people knew. it would have been very clear to people. the people i met and intervie
are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a decade before two decades before your something like 1500 african-americans serving across the country at various levels is local, state and federal offices. 14 congressmen, two senators, lieutenant governors. it's really powerful. for the kenai tremendous opportunity and promise in the future and so much changes so quickly. it makes me think about her own moment and wonder how fragile is progress. >> when i was at the newberry, i was looking for michelle obama's ancestors. one other thing as kerry says whether i could find out who is the first person in the family to vote. it was a hopeless quest. but i was in the newberry library, a lovely library in chicago and i stumbled across a book that had voter registrations from the 1860s from north carolina. and i look do not book and no jumpers. and i thought it my father, he's from north carolina. otherwise, my great great great grandfather, who in 1867 40 years old, two years free registered to vote. he was approved as a voter.
, you cannot harass, you cannot intimidate. and before you make any changes in election laws dealing with registration, changing a precinct, local lines for any political position, you have to get pre-clearance from the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. i
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)